Nantucket Part 2

On Thursday, Day 4, we took a driving tour of the entire island, from Siasconset to Madaket. Nantucket is mostly associated with its old architecture and beaches, but 40 percent of the island is conserved land and open to the public. That’s remarkable when you consider the development pressures on the island. Here are the pictures:

The Moors are in the center of the island. This photo is taken near Altar Rock, the fourth highest point on the island. We got stuck in the sand road trying to get up here and had to hike a bit.

The Moors are in the center of the island. This photo is taken near Altar Rock, the fourth highest point on the island. We got stuck in the sand road trying to get up here and had to hike a bit.

It's hard to tell, but this is Windswept Cranberry Bog. Cranberries are really cheap, so I don't they've been harvested here for a few years.

It's hard to tell, but this is Milestone Cranberry Bog. Cranberries are really cheap, so I don't they've been harvested here for a few years.

In Tom Nevers, on the south-central shore of Nantucket, is what used to be a Navy base. This hill is a buried Quonset hut that supposedly was built in the early 1960s as a shelter for JFK in case of nuclear attack. The Kennedy Compound is about 25 miles away, so I don't know how much good it would've been. It has been restored and is owned by the Nantucket Hunting Assocation.

In Tom Nevers, on the south-central shore of Nantucket, is what used to be a Navy base. This hill is a buried Quonset hut that supposedly was built in the early 1960s as a shelter for JFK in case of nuclear attack. The Kennedy Compound is about 25 miles away, so I don't know how much good it would've been. It has been restored and is owned by the Nantucket Hunting Assocation.

Erosion is a huge problem near Siasconset. They're losing about 10 feet of beach per year forcing homes to be relocated. The dropoff here is intense to see in person.

Erosion is a huge problem near Siasconset. They're losing about 10 feet of beach per year forcing homes to be relocated. The dropoff here is intense to see in person.

Here's us carefully looking over the edge.

Here's us carefully looking over the edge.

This is why you don't build near the ocean.

This is why you don't build near the ocean.

The Sankaty Lighthouse has been moved twice, the most recent coming last year.

The Sankaty Head Lighthouse has been moved twice, the most recent coming in 2007.

The village of Siasconset is a remarkable place. It was once a fishing outpost, and the current buildings reflect that with their small scale.

The village of Siasconset is a remarkable place. It was once a fishing outpost, and the current buildings reflect that with their small scale.

It's a very homey place; more pictures of it to come.

It's a very homey place; more pictures of it to come.

On way to Madaket, pictured here and on the west side of the island, we stopped at the Madaket Mall, aka the island dump. The have an area where you can leave or take whatever you want, and there's some great finds.

On the way to Madaket, pictured here and on the west side of the island, we stopped at the Madaket Mall, aka the island dump. It has an area where you can leave or take whatever you want, and there's some great finds.

This is the site of Nantucket's settlement in 1641 before the town was moved to its present location. It was once a golf course, and now it's public land. Beyond is one of the priciest areas on the island, which is saying a lot.

This was the site of Sherburne, Nantucket's settlement in the 1600s before the town was moved to its present location. It was once a golf course, and now it's public land. Beyond is one of the priciest areas on the island, which is saying a lot.

Day 5, which also was my 27th birthday, had us meeting to discuss our internships or independent studies. I was hoping to work with a restoration carpenter, but that doesn’t look like it’s going to happen. Instead, I believe I will be cataloging interior easements for the Nantucket Preservation Trust.

There was nothing of P:IN note on Day 6, but I did attend the Nantucket Film Festival’s All-Star Comedy Roundtable. Ben Stiller was there with writers Harold Ramis, John Hamburg, and Peter Farrely. It was moderated by Chris Matthews, who has a home on the island. Stiller’s parents have spent their summers on Nantucket for years and were in attendance sitting about 10 people away from me in the same row. Christine Taylor was there, too. I couldn’t believe I was in the same room as Sally Sitwell and Tony Wonder (“Arrested Development” fans would catch that).

Today, Day 7, we attended a demonstration by Rudy Christian and Laura Saeger of the Preservation Trades Network. They showed us how to make a mortise and tenon joint in the Atheneum’s garden. Here are the pictures:

Saeger works on the mortise.

Saeger works on the mortise.

Christian works on the tenon.

Christian works on the tenon.

Modern technology made an appearance.

Modern technology made an appearance.

Took a little bit extra work to fit into place.

Took a little bit extra work to fit into place.

Nantucket Preservation Trust director Michael May drives home the peg.

Nantucket Preservation Trust director Michael May drives home the peg.

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Filed under "Arrested Development", Madaket, Nantucket, Nantucket Film Festival, Preservation Institute: Nantucket, Preservation Trades Network, Siasconset

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