Newport Part 3

On Thursday, our third and final day in Newport, we went to The Breakers, the best-known of the city’s “cottages.” Though I think the Marble House was more extravagant, The Breakers certainly lived up to its expectations.

The 65,000-square-foot mansion has 70 rooms. It was finished in 1895 and cost $7 million to build. Richard Morris Hunt was the architect who designed The Breakers to look like an Italian Renaissance mansion (see, Mediterranean mega mansions also were sought after more than a hundred years ago). Like the Marble House, it was built for a Vanderbilt heir. Vanderbilt descendants still live on the third floor and they own all the original furnishings.

Charlie Burns, a curator for the Preservation Society of Newport, showed us around. Photography isn’t allowed inside, but because we were were a special group, we were allowed. Some of the many guards had trouble getting used to this. Unfortunately, my camera isn’t the best and the combination of lack of light and giant rooms resulted in mediocre pictures. Then again, few cameras could do the place justice. Here they are anyway:

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The great room.

The Great Hall.

Dining room.

Dining room.

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It's hard to fathom the craftsmanship in The Breakers and all the Newport mansions we visited. I felt guilty giving a room a quick look over and moving on when so much labor went into each detail.

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The bathtub is carved from a single piece of marble and has faucets for hot and cold fresh water and hot and cold salt water.

The bathtub is carved from a single piece of marble and has faucets for hot and cold fresh water and hot and cold salt water.

The Great Hall is 50 x 50 x 50.

The Great Hall is 50 x 50 x 50.

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breakers ceiling light

Where the servants toiled.

Where the servants toiled.

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Filed under Newport, Preservation Institute: Nantucket, Preservation Society of Newport County, The Breakers

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