Jekyll Island

A benefit of having a sister in the Charleston, South Carolina, area is that there’s many unique historic places to visit along the drive from Florida.  On my way to there four weeks ago I visited Jekyll Island, an island in Georgia. It’s a very laid-back place with excellent examples of restored Victorian-era architecture. You can find them within walking distance of the massive Jekyll Island Club Hotel.

William Horton built this house out of tabby in 1742, and the huse was later lived in by Frenchman Christophe du Bignon.

William Horton built this house out of tabby in 1742. Christophe du Bignon, who fled the French Revolution in the 1790s, later resided in the house. This is what remains.

I appreciated

I appreciate that instead of trying to reconstruct the house to a Brown or du Bignon era appearance, the ruins were simply stabilized thanks to efforts by the Jekyll Island Club members in the late 1800s. It's one of two tabby structures still standing in the state.

The Jekyll Island Club was completed in 1886.

The Jekyll Island Club Hotel was completed in 1888. That's a croquet court in the foreground. My kind of place.

Another view. The hotel was the centerpiece of a resort for some of the wealthiest men in the U.S. and the world from 1888 until 1942. Goodyear, Rockefeller, Morgan, Vanderbilt are all names you'll find here.

The hotel was the centerpiece of a winter resort for some of the wealthiest men in the U.S. and the world from 1888 until 1942. Goodyear, Rockefeller, Morgan, Pulitzer, and Vanderbilt are all names that wintered here. The state bought it after World War II and it languished until the 1970s when it was restored and reopened.

The restored "cottages" are scattered near the hotel

The restored "cottages" are scattered around the hotel.

This house was my favorite.

It was my favorite. It sort of reminded me of the Isaac Bell house in Newport.

There's a lot of architectural variety.

There's a lot of architectural variety.

The inside of this one is an art shop. Most of the houses were restored and were given new uses. Others were still houses rented out by the hotel.

The inside of this one is an art shop. Most of the houses were restored and were given new uses. Others were still houses rented out by the hotel.

Loud palette.

Loud palette.

Maker's mark.

Maker's mark.

This house looks like it's never been restored.

This house looks like it's never been restored.

It looks like it could use some stabilization.

It looks like it could use some stabilization.

Ruins of long-gone house.

Ruins of a long-gone house.

The du Bignon Cottage is the oldest one.

The du Bignon Cottage is the oldest one, from 1884.

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1 Comment

Filed under Jekyll Island, Jekyll Island Club

One response to “Jekyll Island

  1. Pingback: Lowcountry church ruins « Gator Preservationist

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